19 replies »

    • Thank you 🙂 I’m sure with the war happening, it must have been quite a different place to what it is now. It’s quite something to think of the city’s history and what it has been through over the years. Hopefully the political unrest happening in the central and northern regions is resolved soon. It would be awful for Mozambique to revert to those days in the 80’s. We live in the South of Malawi now and it seems thousands of refugees are flooding into the country with awful stories of what is happening there right now. Thank you for your comment 🙂

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  1. Well done Lianne. Your photos is a true reflection of an artist who is gifted in capturing life’s challenges in Beira. I am in Beira at the moment and have been visiting the city on business since 2000

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    • Much gratitude Nico, it’s good to know from someone who frequents Beira so often, that I have captured a bit of that Beira spirit! It’s really quite difficult to explain ‘what Beira is like’ to people who have never been there! Although, you’ve got to be there to feel the energy of this unique city. Happiness, perseverance, tragedy, horror and humour all rolled into one! Thank you for your comment and safe travels 🙂

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  2. My second home.I lived in this Beira for 2 years and I loved it.I wish I could go back for good.people so loving and welcoming.wow the photos showed the place exactly as is.

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    • Thank you 🙂 I know how you feel about Beira…or for me, Mozambique in general. In fact doing this post made me feel quite homesick for it! While I am a South African, living in Malawi – Mozambique truly felt like home and I miss it! I’m happy to hear that this post has brought back some of the memories for you 🙂 Thanks for reading!

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  3. I was born in Beira, left in 1974 and it’s the first time I’m seeing pictures of it. I don’t know if I would survive there, I would have to rescue people and animals. Too heartbreaking…thanks for sharing your experience.

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    • I have always wondered what that time (the mass 1974 exodus as they call it) must have been like for the Portuguese. So many of the old houses and factories still stand derelict and deserted. It’s certainly changed since then and I’m sure that should you ever go back again it will come as quite a shock! Things have also changed in that Beira/Mozambique is buzzing with Chinese development. There are plenty of Chinese style buildings popping up these days! Mind you, that is the case with most of Africa! For me, having never known Beira before, I had no memories attached to this city and no choice but to frequent it regularly, which perhaps made me look for the good in it…otherwise I think I’d have gone positively mad!!! Thanks for getting in touch 🙂

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  4. This is where I come from. Despite not even being born there, it’s the birthplace of my mother, my parents were married there and my mum was pregnant with me when they left. It took me 38 years to go back and I’m afraid I could be included in the group who can’t wait to go back to the “first world”. I now wish I could return, with a small camera and eyes wide open. Thank you so much for this.

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    • Thank you so much for your comment. I’m sure your parents will have painted a very different picture to what it is now! I can imagine the shock you must have felt and the difficulty in finding anything ‘romantic’ about Beira, especially when imagining your parents wedding! I’m very glad to hear this post has awakened a new curiosity in you about Beira. Getting the first plane back to the the “first world” is something that often crossed my mind when there, especially when getting stuck in the drain or having to drive on those crazy, chaotic roads!

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  5. Amazing insight Lianne. “Chaos” was the first word that sprung to mind when I glanced at the photos, followed by “resilience” during my second scroll through. I’ve seen both time and again on my travels through southern Africa but Beira has to be the epitome of it all like you say. The shot of the pig in the wheelbarrow is priceless. Ditto the chickens swinging from the rickshaw. (I hope they weren’t alive at that point)!

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  6. Hi, I am going to pass your link to my cousin who still lives in South Africa, originally Rhodesian, as this was their family vacation spot many years ago. I am sure she will enjoy a smile or two, or shed a tear! Loved this one, thanks for sharing your pictures. Liz

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    • Thanks Liz! I’m sure he’ll find the changes quite interesting. My mother (also from Rhodeisa) frequented Beira as a child, including the Grande Hotel. Visiting Beira now and then are 2 completely different experiences! Thanks for sharing this post.

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  7. Amazing Lianne!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Beira is a special place that has touched my heart as well! I hope you and your family are well and I look forward to visiting you one of these days!

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